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tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair will now recognizes the gentleman from california, for five minutes. mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. speaker. i join my colleagues here in congress from both sides of the aisle to call for the end to the war in afghanistan. after more than a decade of war, with now more than ,000 lives lost, and hundreds of millions of american tax dollars spent, it's time for our troops to come home to their families. i represent the military communities of travis air force base and come january i will represent the community of beale air force base as well. i can tell you from firsthand experience that the men and women who serve in our nation's military and their families are america's finest. they are not afraid of sacrifice . they joined the armed forces because they love our country and they are willing to give everything to keep our nation safe. but their sacrifice must be for a reason. if we are going to ask them to risk life and limb on the other side of the world, it must be for a mission that is vital to our nation's security. we can no longer say t
's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. speaker. we're back and america expects that we ought to be going back to work and we have a heavy load ahead of us. we want to make sure that every american has the opportunity to climb that economic and social ladder as high as they want you can go so we have to make sure those ladders of opportunity are in place. we also have to make sure that we are a compassionate nation, that we're willing to reach out to those in our country who have been harmed by devastating natural disasters. we certainly saw this on the east coast and i'd like to spend a good portion of this hour talking about how we as a nation can respond to superstorm sandy and the lessons that we should learn from had disaster. it's not the first that has occurred in america, and it's certainly not going to be the last. in the previous disasters we learned a few lessons but it seems as though we have achieved the necessary wisdom from those
member on the energy and commerce committee, the gentleman from california, mr. waxman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much for yielding to me. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the bill. a warmer planet has less ice, higher sea levels, more water in the atmosphere, more powerful storms, more frequent floods, dreier droughts and worse wildfires. two weeks ago hurricane sandy brought a powerful and tragic reminder that the combination of sea level rise and more powerful storms can be deadly, devastating and extremely costly. hurricane sandy was the only -- only the latest and most dramatic in a series of extreme weather events. over the past two years we've had recordbreaking temperatures , the worst drought in 50 years , major floods, numerous tornadoes and thunderstorms and vast wildfires. this is what global warming looks like. and if we continue to ignore it it will soon look far worse. we should be doing all we can to reduce carbon pollution and slow global warming. but this bill instead tries to s
twitter account. first, the program from the commonwealth club in california and th. >> good evening and welcome. i am your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everyone to listen to us online. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. mark feed man is c.e. ofmente and founder of encore.org. an organization working to promote encore careers, second acts for the greater good. he spear headed the experience corp one of the biggest service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize which annually provides five 100,000 dollar prices. >> freedman was described as the voice of aging baby boomers for who are sur suing meaningful and sustaining work for later in life. while the "wall street journal" stated he has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he's the author of "the big shift: navigating the new stage beyond midlife" published in april 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work with a potential to affect our individual lives and collective future. rec
. we will talk about him later. host: back in 1984 -- guest: the republican party in california is a mirror of the party, and a sense that they lost track of where the country was moving. it was their extreme right wing philosophy and policies which do not match. host: why is that a mirror image of what we are dealing with today? guest: we have had a hard time convincing latinos to register and to vote. an anti-immigration initiative on the ballot. they registered, and now they are a power in california, as they are in other states. you go out and you oppose the dream backact. -- opposed the dream act -- mitt romney saying people should self-deport, sell their house and go back to mexico? you cannot win latino votes when you make war against them. host: one supporting mitt romney in this election said they need to go after hispanic support in 2016. guest: i once thought that man you mentioned was one of the rising stars. when he left the party, i did not buy his reasons for doing so. i did not think republicans should write off the african americans at all. talking about improvi
of the regulators of electricity in places like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to their energy providers to promote more efficiency through the advantage of the consumer by reducing rates. i think there are many things we will be able to agree on that will advance the cause of de- carbgonizaing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources and uses as well as efficiency trouble parallel to the interests of good environmental policy. >> in 2007, congress agreed on standards, and the administration has continued to work to move those numbers up even more. there is a classic example where we actually did something that had a real impact. >> i wondered -- the recommendations you are making -- i understand you are trying to bring together these agencies across the executive branch. these legislative branch is very much a partner in this. how do your recommendations during the congressional leadership in and coordinate them as well as with the executive branch leadership? >> we will recommend that this be institutionalized or created also legislatively. but i think co
for how they deal with higher education. you have some states like california which has been the premier example planning for the last 50 years. the state university of new york, you know. then you have michigan. and michigan, since the frontier days, has selected anarchy. what that means is each of the 15 public campuses and in the state have constitutional autonomy. we have no umbrella organization, and a shield -- no shield. the philosophy has allowed the university of michigan to develop with one of the los all levels of support. actually, no support at all for education until the late 19th century. they spent all the money but came from selling land and kept it. the university of michigan has learned from that. and consciously over the last several decades has redesigned itself. through a variety of steps, pushing the cold -- the control of resources, the responsibility down to the lowest possible level. that created an organization that was an extraordinarily adapted to change and which at the helm, there's very little concern at all. in fact, the steering wheel was not even connec
the way if is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from california is recognized. >> mr. speaker, as the republican of georgia deals with its first democratic transition of power, i spent the last few days speaking at length with the president and the new prime minister about the necessity to continue the pursuit of the rule of law. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, this is a critical moment for the georgian people that can either put the country on a path of sustainable democracy or turn back the clock on the tremendous gains that have been made since the rose revolution. mr. speaker, the united states must remain engaged with the new government to promote continued democratic reform. a robust democracy demands not only the ability of the majority party to advance the agenda, but also the preservation of the rights of the minority, to raise questions and ho
generation from the commonwealth of california with author mark friedman. following that, we will open up our phone lines to get your thoughts of retirement and the economy. we will also open up a twitter hashtag. at 3:00, the united nations security council is set to discuss the situation in israel. we will keep you posted on any possible changes in the security council meeting. >> you career officers, and you changed this army into a volunteer army. go find your soldiers in the labour market. we did that. over five or six years, we created an absolutely splendid force of young men and women who served their country as volunteers. they had the same tradition, culture, loyalty, and dedication as any other group of americans. they prove themselves in the head of an invasion, the gulf war, iraq, and afghanistan. the theme that we have to keep in mind is something that president lincoln said, to care for those who are born out of battle. the windows, the children. to care. never forget that they are carrying the american spirit, the american traditions with them. when they get injured and her, w
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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